Frank discussions, advice, and opinions from a Catholic Director of Religious Education.



Tuesday, February 7, 2012

Traditores

Diocletion
The year is 303 AD and the Emperor Diocletian has issued an edict against all Christians. They may live, but their churches will be demolished. Their sacred texts will be burned.  Their civil rights and honors will be stripped from them.

Think about that.

Anything about that sound familiar to you? You can be Catholic, but not in public. You can be Christian, but you must look and act like everyone else.

It is well known at this point, at least among Catholic bloggers, that the government is going to begin forcing Catholic universities, hospitals and charities to sin by requiring them to purchase products that their faith says are immoral. The alternative? Shut down and leave public life. In other words, we can be Catholic, just not if it actually plays a role in our lives.

In Diocletian's day, men and women died refusing to obey unjust laws. These Christians put their lives on the line and won a martyr's crown. Sadly, many were betrayed by fellow Christians. These betrayers were called the Traditores. They are the ones who "had handed over" the sacred texts and betrayed their brothers and sisters.

There are traditores now.

Despite almost every single U.S. Bishop releasing a statement against this mandate, many prominent Catholics have turned their back on the faith, choosing to cooperate with an unjust edict enforced by an administration which is hostile to Catholics. It is not a coincidence that so many catholics were appointed by Obama or found high positions in the Democrat hierarchy. They were chosen to provide cover for Catholics who chose to vote against the faith.

Examples? Love to.

Kathleen Sebelius is a Catholic. She is the Secretary of Health and Human Services. That department put forward this mandate. She is a traditor.

Nancy Pelosi is a Catholic. She is the former Speaker of the House. She stands with her fellow traditores  "in supporting the administration."


Kathleen Sebelius: Traditor
Nancy Pelosi: Traditor
 Two things.

One: Don't think my anger is confined to Democrats. Republicans aren't exactly squeaky clean either. It just so happens that they are, at the moment, not actively persecuting God's Holy Catholic Church like the Democrats seem to be.

Two: If these two women, or any of their peers, were to recant their position supporting this mandate and other grave evils I would be happy to be the first to praise that move and retract my accusation of treachery. We must forgive. We must show mercy. God knows I need forgiveness myself, but while things persist in this manner we must not shirk our duty to the truth. The government is persecuting us for our beliefs. They are trying to remove us from public life and seal us in a ghetto because we are Catholic. We cannot pretend that everything is peachy or that the icy knife of treachery hasn't pierced our back. It is a sin against charity not to recognize what our brother and sister Catholics have done.

Pray for them. Pray for our country. Pray for yourselves.

3 comments:

  1. My last note posted to Fr. Z's site:
    It is a characteristic of our age that there are words which will not be used by those who should declare them: treason, excommunication, penance, all are words which do not mesh with society’s notions of self esteem. Odd though, how so many can be condemned for insisting that right and wrong are not abstract concepts.

    It seems that no one, not even a Cardinal, is prepared to say: j'accuse.

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    Replies
    1. There are extremes on both sides. "Traitor!" is easily followed by "Hang Them!". The opposite problem is that treachery usually preceeds "Hang Them!" for the other side. Our goal is charity in truth, a hard one indeed.

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  2. I have to fight to think charitable things about my mislead sisters in Christ. Great post!

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